Diversitycouncil.org

1130 1/2 7th Street NW

Rochester, MN 55902

507-282-9951

info@diversitycouncil.org

© 2018 Diversity Council

Film Lending Library

Southern Poverty Law Center Teaching Tolerance Series

 

Bullied: A Student, a School and a Case that Made History. From the Teaching Tolerance series. This documentary tells the story of Jamie, who endured years of bullying and then took a stand. He went to court and fought for the right to be safe as school, even if you are gay. 38 minutes. 

The Children’s March.  The children who fought in the Civil Rights Movement.  40 minutes.  

 

One Survivor Remembers. Gerda Weissmann was 15 when the Nazis came for her. On the day of her liberation from six years of Nazi rule, she weighed 68 pounds, her hair had turned white, and she had not had a bath in three years. She survived with courage, grace and dignity. Winner of the Academy Award for Best Documentary Short Subject. 

 

The Shadow of Hate: A History of Intolerance in America. Produced by three-time Academy Award winner Charles Guggenheim, this documentary spans three centuries to examine this country’s ongoing struggle to live up to its ideals of liberty, equality and justice. 40 minutes. Closed captioned. VHS

 

Viva la Causa. The story of Cesar Chavez and a great movement for social justice. From the Teaching Tolerance series. 

 

Starting Small: Teaching Tolerance in Preschool and the Early Grades. DVD includes classroom activities and a resource guide. From the Teaching Tolerance series. 58 minutes.

 

Not in Our Town. An inspiring documentary on the grassroots response to hate crime that began in Billings, Montana, and spread to towns across America, including Rochester. 

 

Not In Our Town: Light in the Darkness. Residents of a Long Island village take action after anti-immigrant violence devastates their community. 60 minutes. 

 

Let’s Get Real. Name-calling and bullying have reached epidemic proportions in schools today. This documentary gives young people the chance to speak up in their own words about the real issues behind the problem, from sexual orientation to disability, from race to religion and more. For students in grades 6 and up, and for adults who work with kids. Curriculum guide and Spanish subtitles available. 

 

A Girl Like Me. Produced by a teenager who repeats the doll experiment that affected the outcome of Brown v. Board of Education on the 50th anniversary of the decision—with the same results. Young black children are shown a white doll and a black doll and asked which one they like better. From the Media that Matters Film Festival. 

 

What Would You Do? This series from ABC News sets up real-life situations while a hidden camera watches how people respond.

 

Mexican immigrants: A barista mocks Hispanic customers with poor English and evicts them from his shop. How will patrons respond?

 

The Muslim woman: A shopkeeper refuses service to a customer wearing an Islamic head covering. Will anyone stand up for her?

 

Bullying: A group of kids start picking on one of their group in a public area. How will others in the area respond?

 

On Weight: When a woman at the beach is taunted about her weight by complete strangers, will anyone speak up?

 

Teen Vandals: A group of teens vandalize a car in a public area. How will passersby respond? And will the response be any different when the white teen actors are replaced by black teens?

 

Racist cab driver: How will passengers react to a taxi driver who goes on an extensive racist rant filled with hateful ethnic slurs? Will they challenge him? Keep quiet? Or join in?

 

Local

 

Living Together: A History of Prejudice in Olmsted County.  19 minutes. (VHS)

 

Finding You in Me. St. Paul immigrant students talk about their experiences. Produced by the Boys & Girls Club.  22 minutes. 

The Diversity Council maintains a collection of diversity-related films that may be checked out by Olmsted County residents with a $25 deposit.

 

 

Race: The Power of an Illusion. An award-winning three-part documentary from PBS.  

Part 1: “The Difference Between Us.”  The genetics of race. 56 minutes.  

Part 2: “The Story We Tell.”  The history of race as a social construct. 56 minutes.

Part 3: “The House We Live In.”  How institutions perpetuate racial inequality. 56 minutes.

 

Racism as a Mental Illness. Racism in the extreme. When does a social ill become a diagnosed mental illness? From ABC News Nightline. 

 

American in Black & White: Prom Night. A small Georgia town has separate dances for black and white students. After trying an integrated dance once, the segregation returns. What’s going on? ABC News Nightline. 

 

Race & Sex: What We Think But Don’t Say. Psychologists say we pigeonhole people by categories like age, race and gender because our brains are wired to do it automatically. Can we overcome stereotypes? From ABC News 20/20. 

 

Lee Mun Wah

 

The Color of Fear.  In this award-winning documentary, director Lee Mun Wah facilitates a discussion about racism with nine men.  90 minutes. (VHS)

 

Last Chance for Eden.  From the award-winning director of The Color of Fear, comes Lee Mun Wah’s long awaited film about nine women and men who being an honest and emotionally charged conversation about how racism and sexism have affected their lives and families.   88 minutes.  (VHS)

 

Across the Waves: Voices from the Asian-Pacific American Community. Narrated by Sandra Oh of Grey's Anatomy and Ming Na of Mulan, this documentary brings together members from eight Asian-Pacific American communities who share their struggles and triumphs in their own words. Accompanying lesson plan for middle and high school also available. 

Little Rock Central: 50 Years Later. 50 years after the Supreme Court ended school segregation with Brown v. Board of Education, how far have we come, and how far do we still need to go? This intimate, eye-opening film spends time in and out of the classroom and includes and interview with one of the original “Little Rock Nine.” 70 minutes. 

 

Jane Elliott - Jane Elliott’s widely known “Blue-Eyed/Brown Eyed” exercise is the oldest and most celebrated anti-racism awareness program in the country. 

 

Blue Eyed.  In Blue-Eyed, Elliott separates a group of 40 typical Midwestern adults by eye color.  In no time, the stigmatized blue-eyed members become distracted and depressed, demonstrating the impact of life-long discrimination on minority achievement and self-esteem.  93 minutes.  (VHS)

 

Essential Blue-Eyed.  Special trainer’s edition. 86 minutes. (VHS)

 

A Class Divided.  Footage from Jane Elliott’s original elementary school class experiment, along with interviews with her grown students. 56 minutes. 

 

The New Americans: This three-part series tells the powerful stories of today’s immigrants and refugees, following them from homelands and refugee camps they leave behind through their first tumultuous years in America.  

 

Part 1: Follows refugees from Nigeria, Dominican Republic, and Palestine. 115 minutes.

 

Part 2:  Follows the 3 immigrants from previous episodes and their struggle in America.  115 minutes.

 

Part 3: Follows an Indian family as well as the previous three families’ continuing struggle in America.  170 minutes.

 

The Letter. A dramatic documentary about the firestorm of controversy that erupted when the mayor of Lewiston, Maine, sent an open letter to Somali refugees asking them to stop moving to his town. 76 minutes. 

 

Precious Knowledge. This documentary tells the story of students and teachers who fought to keep a Mexican-American studies program in their school. Although the program raised the graduation rate of Hispanic participants to 93%, it was banned by the state legislature who saw it as part of a conspiracy to violently overthrow the government. 70 minutes.

 

Breaking Out of "The Man Box". A radical challenge to the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that have created an environment that support and tolerates men's violence against women. DVD and book.

Miss Representation. A documentary exploring the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America and challenging the media's limited portrayal of what it means to be a powerful woman.